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Children's Eye Care

Good eyesight is an important factor in a child's development and yet research shows that around 20% of school-aged children have an undiagnosed vision problem. 

 

A child’s eyes develop dramatically during the early years of life and so to ensure that a child develops to their full potential it is important to look after their eyes.     Children’s eyes can be checked at any age and contrary to public perceptions we can assess their vision as accurately as in adults.

As an NHS registered practice we provide free* eye examinations for children and can also issue an NHS optical voucher providing free* glasses.  Vouchers are available to anyone under the age of 16, or aged 16-18 and in full-time education.

Children don't complain about visual problems and some eye conditions do not display any signs or symptoms.  The only way of knowing for sure that your child does not have an issue, is for your child to have an eye examination.

In some cases there are some tell-tale signs ...

  • An eye turned inwards or outwards, even temporary (e.g. when tired)

  • Not showing an interest in reading or having difficultly with concentration

  • Complaining about headaches or rubbing their eyes often

  • Sitting very close to the TV

 

If you recognise any of these symptoms in your child you should arrange for your child to have an eye examination.  Eye examinations are also important if a squint, long-sightedness or short-sightedness exist in your family as these conditions can be inherited.

In addition to a standard eye examination our optometrists can also - carry out tests for measuring the vision in children having problems with letters recognition; perform acuity tests optimised to detect 'lazy eye' (Amblyopia); refer children to the local hospital eye department for signs of squint or ‘lazy eye’

If your child attends a playgroup in Tayside they may be vision screened by an orthoptist at the age of 4.  Vision Screening is a basic test to identify any signs of reduced vision and if detected they will be referred to an optometrist for a full eye examination.  As research has shown that vision screening may not detect longsightedness or astigmatism that can affect learning, your child should have a full eye examination before they start school or if there are any concerns before the age of 4.

 

*Free eye examinations and glasses are funded by NHS Scotland.  By law children’s glasses must be dispensed by a qualified person or under the supervision of a qualified person.